Eating disorders link

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2012288/Rise-middle-aged-women-eating-disorders.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

Okay, this is great, but what about the men?

Men and boys get eating disorders, too, but the writer of this article disregards males entirely.

It would just figure.  The writer talks about older women being a hidden population of sufferers.  Seems that this writer missed something.  It kind of made me flinch.

Unfortunately, comments are closed, otherwise I would have left one.

There is sadness everywhere

My sadness is so, so big
It towers over everything
It covers everything
It is like the sky
It is everywhere
It is a given
That is why no one can see it
Half the time, I can’t even see it myself
Until I open my chest wide
And wrench my heart out of its sockets
And watch sadness pour out of the ventricles.

Today is May 10th

When I was a child–maybe five years old–my mother hurt me.  She cornered me in the bathroom.  She hurt me more than once.  More than twice.  She sang while she did it and I was so little that I thought all mothers did it to their kids.  I thought that this was supposed to happen.  I knew I deserved it.

I don’t know.  Maybe I deserved to suffer from an eating disorder for 31 years, too.

I didn’t remember anything about what my mother did to me until yesterday morning while I was tying my shoe.  I was getting ready to take out my dog, Puzzle.

The puzzle pieces have been coming into place ever since.  There will always be missing pieces, but the images are very clear, and were from the beginning.

Today, May 10, 2011, my mother turns 85.  I am not celebrating.

Anorexia in the DSM-5

Here is the DSM-IV definition of Anorexia Nervosa:

A. Refusal to maintain body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height (e.g., weight loss leading to maintenance of body weight less than 85% of that expected; or failure to make expected weight gain during period of growth, leading to body weight less than 85% of that expected).

B. Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight.

C. Disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight.

D. In postmenarcheal females, amenorrhea, i.e., the absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles. (A woman is considered to have amenorrhea if her periods occur only following hormone, e.g., estrogen, administration.)

Specify type:

Restricting Type: during the current episode of Anorexia Nervosa, the person has not regularly engaged in binge eating or purging behavior (i.e., self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas)

Binge-Eating/Purging Type: during the current episode of Anorexia Nervosa, the person has regularly engaged in binge eating or purging behavior (i.e., self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas)

Here is the proposed DSM-V definition of Anorexia Nervosa:

A. Restriction of energy intake relative to requirements leading to a significantly low body weight in the context of age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health. Significantly low weight is defined as a weight that is less than minimally normal, or, for children and adolescents, less than that minimally expected.

B. Intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, or persistent behavior that interferes with weight gain, even though at a significantly low weight.

C.  Disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight.

Specify current type:

Restricting Type: during the last three months, the person has not engaged in recurrent episodes of binge eating or purging behavior (i.e., self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas)

Binge-Eating/Purging Type: during the last three months, the person has engaged in  recurrent episodes of binge eating or purging behavior (i.e., self-induced vomiting or the misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas)

Binge Eating Disorder in the DSM-V

I’ve just been to the DSM-5 website.  Here is their stated rationale for including BED as a diagnosis in the latest version of the Diagnostics and Statistics Manual, which is the manual used for categorizing patients:

Rationale

Binge Eating Disorder is one of the disorders in the DSM-IV appendix. It is recommended that it be formally included as a disorder in DSM-5.

The rationale for recommending inclusion of binge eating disorder (BED) in DSM-5 is based on a comprehensive literature review (Wonderlich, Gordon, Mitchell, Crosby, & Engel, 2009). Below we address several key recommendations offered by Kendler et al. as they apply to BED.

Consistent with Kendler et al’s recommendation for making decisions about diagnoses in the Appendix, the Eating Disorders Work Group addressed the question, “Should the BED diagnosis should be a) deleted from the appendix, b) promoted to the main manual, or c) retained in the appendix.

 

Synopsis of the Review of Validators.

The following comments are organized according to the structure of the table of validators provided by Kendler et al. (2009) and based on a literature review (Wonderlich et al., 2009). BED has been compared to both other eating disorders (i.e., anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa) and obesity in validational studies. Overall, BED distinguishes itself from other eating disorders and obesity across a wide range of validators, including high priority validators.

In terms of antecedent validators, there is evidence from family history studies that BED tends to run in families and is not a simple familial variation of obesity. Furthermore, in comparison to other eating disorders, BED shows a relatively distinct demographic profile with a greater likelihood of male cases, older age, and a later age of onset.

Regarding studies of concurrent validators, BED is also differentiated from obesity in terms of greater concerns about shape and weight, more personality disturbance, and a higher likelihood of psychiatric comorbidity in the form of mood disorders and anxiety disorders. Also, BED is associated with lower quality of life than obesity.

Finally, in terms of predictive validators, BED may be differentiated from other eating disorders in terms of its lower level of diagnostic stability and greater likelihood of remission.  In clinical course, BED also shows a greater likelihood of medical morbidities (e.g., self-reported weight gain and metabolic syndrome indicators) than is typically seen in other eating disorders, or in obesity. Finally, in studies of treatment response, there is evidence that individuals with BED have a more positive response to specialty treatments than to generic behavioral weight loss treatments in terms of reduction of eating disorder psychopathology.  These findings suggest some evidence of clinical utility of the BED diagnosis in terms of treatment selection; for example, antidepressant medication is useful in the treatment of BED, but is not generally useful in the treatment of obesity.

 

Comments on the book, “Skinny Bitch” on Amazon – Check out this link

I found the following comments on the book, Skinny Bitch on Amazon.  I do not plan to support these authors by buying their book!  I would like to see a copy to see if I can add to the discussion somehow, but not by making a purchase of any kind.  But would I, skinny bitch, dare be seen checking this book out of the library?  (More anorexic paranoia, I suppose.)

Here’s the link:

http://www.amazon.com/review/R2LVT0WBBC3RU3/ref=cm_cr_dp_cmt?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0762424931&nodeID=283155&tag=&linkCode=#wasThisHelpful